Bad Heater Core

Discussion in 'LS, LT, LTZ' started by Allie7, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. Allie7

    Allie7 Member

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    I've a 2010 Cobalt LT, 98k miles. First off, is there a way to bypass the heater core so coolant stops leaking into cabin? If so, how please?

    Next, could the issue be leaky coolant hoses (leading to heater core) or coolant pump? I recently switched from parking in garage to parking on our steep driveway and I wonder if the coolant pooled/pressurized and created air pockets or something? Is it easy to check for leaky hoses or the pump yourself? (Do you have to take apart dash for that?)

    Finally, is heater core replacement doable yourself? Does the a/c freon need to be recharged or some such (requiring special tools)?

    Thank you! :allesmoegliche024:

    ---------- Post added at 11:44 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:12 AM ----------

    I'm also worried about electrolysis. My husband did a coolant flush in July. As well he replaced knock sensor and actuator camshaft sensors. Anyone had experience from heater core failure due to electrolysis? Is there something I should look for or can we test it easily ourselves?
     
  2. YelloEye

    YelloEye Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You can bypass the heater core by removing the hoses that go to the heater core and just running a tube between the input and output on the block.

    It is possible that the hoses or core are damaged.
     
  3. Allie7

    Allie7 Member

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    Thank you so much YelloEye! :)
     
  4. wehan

    wehan Full Access Member

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    You can check for electrolysis with a multimeter there's a few videos on YouTube on how to do this although I doubt that's what the issue is. Usually electrolysis only takes place in an older cooling system with zero maintenance.
     

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