How to bleed brakes

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by Cobalt Tom, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. Cobalt Tom

    Cobalt Tom Platinum Member

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    I cannot take credit for originally writing this:

    This is actually a very easy job, but requires that the steps be followed exactly and carefully to avoid any complications. You will need two people for this job.

    As Halfj99 points out below, this is done with the car off.

    First, get your car on stands and take the wheels off. Then top off your reservoir using a quality DOT 3 fluid.

    [​IMG]

    There really aren't any "FULL" lines on it. Just fill it to the seam at the top.

    The proper order to bleed in is right rear, left front, left rear, right front. The pictures below are not in order.

    Fronts first for this how to. Prepare the bleeder plug for the wheel you are going to work on. Slip a 10mm box end wrench over it (not pictured) and then a length of 3/8 I.D. vinyl tubing. You want it to be clear so you can see the fluid. Use a waste bottle to catch fluid.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a rear drum. This bleeder nut is an 8mm.

    [​IMG]

    With your helper, get your signals straight. I use "on-on", "off-off". Tell your helper that when they hear you say "on", they are to apply full brake pedal to the floor and hold it there, and then reply "on". Make sure they know to not release the pedal until commanded. Conversly, when you say "off", they are to fully release it and the let the pedal travel fully up and then reply "off".

    Here we go. Crack the bleeder plug open. Only open it about a quarter to half turn. Any more can allow air to enter via the threads. Call "on". You may or may not get fluid at first. Once your recieve "on", close the bleeder. Call "off". Once you recieve "off", repeat the cycle.

    Continue this until you no longer have any air flowing out of the line. Do one full cycle of full fluid, and then your done with that wheel.

    Before moving on to the next wheel, top off your reservoir again. Do this before each wheel.

    If you are simply bleeding your system, you are done. If you are replacing all your old brake fluid, now go back to the first wheel and start over again. This time, there won't be any air. You are looking for a color change in the fluid, indicating that you are now pumping fresh fluid. Repeat for the other wheels.
     
  2. cobalt123

    cobalt123 Platinum Member

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    cool
     
  3. deanwilliams

    deanwilliams Junior Member

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    fluid amount

    ...so if I siphon out old fluid in the master...re-fill with new fluid and then bleed all the brakes about how much fluid will I need all together? Also how old is open bottle of fluid considered to old to use? Thanks.
     

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